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Lyrical ballads : 1798 and 1802 / William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge ; edited with an introduction and notes by Fiona Stafford.

By: Wordsworth, William, 1770-1850 [author.].
Contributor(s): Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, 1772-1834 [author.] | Stafford, Fiona J [editor of compilation.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Oxford world's classics (Oxford University Press): Publisher: Oxford, United Kingdom : Oxford University Press, 2013Description: lvi, 371 pages ; 20 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780199601967 (pbk.); 0199601968 (pbk.).Subject(s): English poetry -- 18th century. (1745 - 1800) | Ballads, English | Lyric poetryDDC classification: 821.6
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: Lyrical Ballads, With A Few Other Poems, 1798 -- Advertisement -- The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere -- The Foster-Mother's Tale -- Lines left upon a Seat in a Yew-tree which stands near the Lake of Esthwaite -- The Nightingale, a Conversational Poem -- The Female Vagrant -- Goody Blake and Harry Gill -- Lines written at a small distance from my House, and sent by my little Boy to the Person to whom they are addressed -- Simon Lee, the old Huntsman -- Anecdote for Fathers -- We are Seven -- Lines written in early spring -- The Thorn -- The Last of the Flock -- The Dungeon -- The Mad Mother -- The Idiot Boy -- Lines written near Richmond, upon the Thames, at Evening -- Expostulation and Reply -- The Tables turned; an Evening Scene, on the same subject -- Old Man travelling -- The Complaint of a forsaken Indian Woman -- The Convict -- Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey -- Lyrical Ballads, With Pastoral And Other Poems, 1802 -- Preface --
Contents note continued: Expostulation and Reply -- The Tables turned; an Evening Scene, on the same subject -- Animal Tranquillity and Decay, a Sketch -- Goody Blake and Harry Gill -- The Last of the Flock -- Lines left upon a Seat in a Yew-tree which stands near the Lake of Esthwaite -- The Foster-Mother's Tale -- The Thorn -- We are Seven -- Anecdote for Fathers -- Lines written at a small distance from my House, and sent by my little Boy to the Person to whom they are addressed -- The Female Vagrant -- Lines written in early Spring -- Simon Lee, the old Huntsman -- The Nightingale, written in April, 1798 -- The Idiot Boy -- Love -- The Mad Mother -- The Ancient Mariner -- Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey -- Wordsworth's Endnotes -- Hart-leap Well -- There was a Boy -- The Brothers -- Ellen Irwin, or the Braes of Kirtle -- Strange fits of passion I have known -- She dwelt among th' untrodden ways -- A slumber did my spirit seal --
Contents note continued: The Waterfall and the Eglantine -- The Oak and the Broom, a Pastoral -- The Complaint of a forsaken Indian Woman -- Lucy Gray -- 'Tis said that some have died for Love -- The Idle Shepherd-Boys, or Dungeon-Gill Force, a Pastoral -- Poor Susan -- Inscription for the Spot where the Hermitage stood on St. Herbert's Island, Derwent-Water -- Lines written with a Pencil upon a stone in the wall of the House (an Out-house) on the Island at Grasmere -- To a Sexton -- Andrew Jones -- Ruth -- Lines written with a Slate-Pencil -- Lines written on a Tablet in a School -- The Two April Mornings -- The Fountain, a Conversation -- Nutting -- Three years she grew in sun and shower -- The Pet-Lamb, a Pastoral -- Written in Germany, on one of the coldest days of the Century -- The Childless Father -- The Old Cumberland Beggar, a Description -- Rural Architecture -- A Poet's Epitaph -- A Fragment -- Poems on the Naming of Places --
Contents note continued: Lines written when sailing in a Boat at Evening -- Remembrance of Collins, written upon the Thames, near Richmond -- The Two Thieves, or the last stage of Avarice -- A whirl-blast from behind the Hill -- Song for the Wandering Jew -- Michael, a Pastoral Poem -- Appendix. 'What is usually called Poetic Diction' -- Wordsworth's Endnotes.
Summary: Wordsworth and Coleridge's joint collection of poems has often been singled out as the founding text of English Romanticism. This is the only edition to print both the original 1798 collection and the expanded 1802 edition, with Wordsworth's famous preface. It includes important letters, a wide-ranging introduction and generous notes.
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Main library online catalogue( Online Public Access Calaogue-OPAC)

General Collection 821.6 W56 (Browse shelf) 132727 Available 132727

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Machine generated contents note: Lyrical Ballads, With A Few Other Poems, 1798 -- Advertisement -- The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere -- The Foster-Mother's Tale -- Lines left upon a Seat in a Yew-tree which stands near the Lake of Esthwaite -- The Nightingale, a Conversational Poem -- The Female Vagrant -- Goody Blake and Harry Gill -- Lines written at a small distance from my House, and sent by my little Boy to the Person to whom they are addressed -- Simon Lee, the old Huntsman -- Anecdote for Fathers -- We are Seven -- Lines written in early spring -- The Thorn -- The Last of the Flock -- The Dungeon -- The Mad Mother -- The Idiot Boy -- Lines written near Richmond, upon the Thames, at Evening -- Expostulation and Reply -- The Tables turned; an Evening Scene, on the same subject -- Old Man travelling -- The Complaint of a forsaken Indian Woman -- The Convict -- Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey -- Lyrical Ballads, With Pastoral And Other Poems, 1802 -- Preface --

Contents note continued: Expostulation and Reply -- The Tables turned; an Evening Scene, on the same subject -- Animal Tranquillity and Decay, a Sketch -- Goody Blake and Harry Gill -- The Last of the Flock -- Lines left upon a Seat in a Yew-tree which stands near the Lake of Esthwaite -- The Foster-Mother's Tale -- The Thorn -- We are Seven -- Anecdote for Fathers -- Lines written at a small distance from my House, and sent by my little Boy to the Person to whom they are addressed -- The Female Vagrant -- Lines written in early Spring -- Simon Lee, the old Huntsman -- The Nightingale, written in April, 1798 -- The Idiot Boy -- Love -- The Mad Mother -- The Ancient Mariner -- Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey -- Wordsworth's Endnotes -- Hart-leap Well -- There was a Boy -- The Brothers -- Ellen Irwin, or the Braes of Kirtle -- Strange fits of passion I have known -- She dwelt among th' untrodden ways -- A slumber did my spirit seal --

Contents note continued: The Waterfall and the Eglantine -- The Oak and the Broom, a Pastoral -- The Complaint of a forsaken Indian Woman -- Lucy Gray -- 'Tis said that some have died for Love -- The Idle Shepherd-Boys, or Dungeon-Gill Force, a Pastoral -- Poor Susan -- Inscription for the Spot where the Hermitage stood on St. Herbert's Island, Derwent-Water -- Lines written with a Pencil upon a stone in the wall of the House (an Out-house) on the Island at Grasmere -- To a Sexton -- Andrew Jones -- Ruth -- Lines written with a Slate-Pencil -- Lines written on a Tablet in a School -- The Two April Mornings -- The Fountain, a Conversation -- Nutting -- Three years she grew in sun and shower -- The Pet-Lamb, a Pastoral -- Written in Germany, on one of the coldest days of the Century -- The Childless Father -- The Old Cumberland Beggar, a Description -- Rural Architecture -- A Poet's Epitaph -- A Fragment -- Poems on the Naming of Places --

Contents note continued: Lines written when sailing in a Boat at Evening -- Remembrance of Collins, written upon the Thames, near Richmond -- The Two Thieves, or the last stage of Avarice -- A whirl-blast from behind the Hill -- Song for the Wandering Jew -- Michael, a Pastoral Poem -- Appendix. 'What is usually called Poetic Diction' -- Wordsworth's Endnotes.

Wordsworth and Coleridge's joint collection of poems has often been singled out as the founding text of English Romanticism. This is the only edition to print both the original 1798 collection and the expanded 1802 edition, with Wordsworth's famous preface. It includes important letters, a wide-ranging introduction and generous notes.

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