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Patterns of lexis in text

By: Hoey, Michael.
Contributor(s): Sinclair, John | Carter, Ronald [Series Editors].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Describing English Language. Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 1991Description: xvii, 276 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0194371425.Subject(s): Discourse analysisDDC classification: 401.41
Contents:
Contents Part I. Introduction: questions that need answering. 1. Questions about cohesion --- 2. A metaphor for text organization ---- Part II. Answers from text analysis. 3. Types of repetition --- 4. Patterns of repetition in non-narrative text --- 5. The significance of repetition nets --- 6. Properties of the bonds of nets --- 7. How the links work ---- Part III. Implications for theory and practice. 8. Implications for a theory of language --- 9. Implications for reading and writing.
Summary: Passages of authentic text are analysed to demonstrate the operations of patterns of lexis across sentence boundaries and over considerable distances within and between texts. These insights are related to a comprehensive theory of language, in which 'lexis' and 'text' are shown to be important levels of language organization. Implications for the teaching of reading and writing are also discussed. First Prize English Speaking Union's Duke of Edinburgh Book Competition
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Main library online catalogue( Online Public Access Calaogue-OPAC)

General Collection 401.41 H52 (Browse shelf) 26456 Available 26456

Contents Part I. Introduction: questions that need answering. 1. Questions about cohesion ---
2. A metaphor for text organization ----
Part II. Answers from text analysis. 3. Types of repetition ---
4. Patterns of repetition in non-narrative text ---
5. The significance of repetition nets ---
6. Properties of the bonds of nets ---
7. How the links work ----
Part III. Implications for theory and practice. 8. Implications for a theory of language ---
9. Implications for reading and writing.

Passages of authentic text are analysed to demonstrate the operations of patterns of lexis across sentence boundaries and over considerable distances within and between texts. These insights are related to a comprehensive theory of language, in which 'lexis' and 'text' are shown to be important levels of language organization. Implications for the teaching of reading and writing are also discussed. First Prize English Speaking Union's Duke of Edinburgh Book Competition

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